Monthly Archives: March 2014

Random Ramblings . . .


My random opinions for your consideration: 

[These are my quotes, and I have been using them for years. Those that know me well will recognize them – sometimes smiling, sometimes cringing LOL 😉 ]

The best thing and the right thing are NOT always the same thing. (This is when moral and ethical dilemmas occur . . . )

People think death is the worst thing that can happen to you, but in reality there are many things in life worse than death. (Think about it, I have . . .  and I’ve seen it.)

When something bad, wrong, unplanned or unpleasant happens, I try to remember if no one is scarred for life, no one is terminally ill and no one has died, as a result – then it can’t be all that bad. (The three things I mentioned can be devastating!)

If it was easy, where would the fucking fun in that be?!? (Sometimes I leave the F* word out depending on my audience, though I have said this is the quote I want on my headstone, with the F* word 😉 )

Just something I was thinking about . . .

Advertisements

Why Do We Keep Giving Our Jobs Away?


This is an article I originally wrote back in December 2004 about the problem of outsourcing American jobs to other countries. I recently found it and was surprised at how nothing has changed in the last ten years and this piece is still pretty spot on. Actually things may be even worse. There’s a greater number of aging baby boomers to work some of these jobs, and they are having an even harder time, often being terminated from their jobs 10-15 years before retirement age, now dipping into their retirement savings to live – but that is another story for a different day.

I hope this trend of corporate greed at the expense of this country’s health and welfare changes soon. Personally, I think if you outsource jobs to other countries that can be done by American workers, you should be heavily taxed. I think companies who maintain their workforce in the United States should be given tax breaks, at least for a period of time.

I note in my article I am NOT an economist or historian, nor am I necessarily politically inclined, so I don’t know all the background about these types of things, but I know enough to know they can be done judiciously and pragmatically. Of course, this will most likely cut into some profit margins – so though it can be done, I am sure it would be a fight. In honor of Throwback Thursday, I thought I would share it with you & see what you think.

 Outsourcing American Jobs Dangerous Trend

I love to read Molly Ivins’ nationally syndicated column. Today’s article was Ivin’s review of two books. One of the books mentioned, “When Work Disappears: The World of the New Urban Poor” by William Julius Wilson, discussed the problems with joblessness in the inner city ghettos. She uses a quote from the book discussing his solutions, which she states as critical for all of us not just for poor inner-city blacks – “The problems of joblessness and social dislocation in the inner city are, in part, related to the processes in the global economy that have contributed to greater inequality & insecurity among American workers in general & to the failure of U.S. social policies to adjust to these processes. It is therefore myopic to view the problems of jobless ghettos as if they were separate from those that plague the larger society.”

This made me think, as I read, that a large percentage of the American workforce is now in danger of this “jobless ghetto” syndrome. I heard President Bush say, during one of the debates, that the key to ending unemployment and government assistance needs is EDUCATION for 21st century jobs. The way I see it, the market is becoming considerably service and technology based. The jobs of the 21st century are huge in the area of technical assistance (development, programming, maintenance) and customer service. These are also the jobs that have been outsourced to other countries, for considerably cheaper labor costs. This is a dangerous trend that has been on the rise in the last five years.

Now, I am not an economics or history expert, but the way it appears to me is that in the last half century jobs have increasingly changed in proportion concerning manufacturing and service-oriented jobs. In the early years of this country up until the first half of the 20th century, manufacturing was a huge part of the economic base. The last half of the 20th century saw a large majority of these jobs being outsourced to other countries because it was cheaper for the manufacturer. This left the service-oriented and technology fields as a way of providing jobs for American citizens. As proved from my last five calls to Dell, and other computer parts manufacturers they are involved with, ALL of their technical support has been outsourced, often times to places where the technicians’ English is accented so heavily, even if they are the most intelligent in the world, I can’t understand a word coming out of their mouths.

If we are sending all the manufacturing, customer service-oriented and technology jobs overseas, what jobs does that leave for Americans? Medical professionals, lawyers, dry-cleaners, and fast-food/restaurant jobs are a few of the jobs left. Do you recognize the large gap in salaries between the first two jobs I mentioned and the second two jobs – the haves and the have-nots?

Do not misunderstand me, I understand the importance of a global economy, but in my opinion we have taken the concept entirely too far. When there is no balance, a considerable amount of middle-class jobs disappear from the U.S. landscape. If this trend continues, jobless ghettos could be as common as tent cities during the Great Depression.

Just something I was thinking about, something I think about often actually.

(And RIP Molly Ivins, you are missed by many!!)

China’s Moon?


When our government decided to cancel NASA’s Constellation Program several years back, which would have taken us back to the moon and to Mars, Homer Hickman (author of Rocket Boys and October Sky) wrote a short story set in the not-so-distant future. This was his take on America in a “post-NASA” world, a world where the United States is not the leader in human space flight exploration.  I wanted to share it with you, as I have some specific opinions that are of a similar topic I will be writing on in the future, and thought this would be a perfect preface.  It’s an interesting tale, for sure – and a little disturbing to say the least.

I hope you find it interesting, as well, whether you support NASA’s endeavors or not. Oh, and were you aware that China landed its first rover on the moon last December?

The Boy Who Looked at the Moon by Homer Hickman

Just something I was thinking about . . .

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 and The Blacklist


Like many of us, I have been wondering when and if they are going to find Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370. I am praying for the families of the 239 souls onboard. I know the general information that has been released. The flight left Kuala Lumpur the night of Mar. 8, then disappeared en route to Beijing. While the backgrounds of the seasoned pilot and experienced co-pilot are under investigation, so far nothing out of the ordinary has been discovered. The FBI has now taken possession of the pilot’s homemade flight simulator to retrieve and analyze some deleted computer files.

Besides the FBI, the NTSB and FAA are involved, as well as 26 countries who are assisting in the search for the plane. As more information is obtained, the search area is redefined. There’s been talk about an island in the Indian Ocean, Diego Garcia, a British territory where the plane may have landed or crashed. It was reported that we have a military presence there in the form of a U.S. Navy support facility, so it seems doubtful they wouldn’t be aware if something had happened near there. I read two-thirds of the passengers were from China, not sure about the rest.

I am a huge follower of NBC’s The Blacklist, meaning I never miss an episode. In one of the early episodes, Raymond Reddington, the main character in this show played by James Spader, tells the special U.S. government agency he is working with that many accidents or catastrophes that have occurred were to cover up other things – things that were not considered when investigating these events, things not on anyone’s radar.

Who were the passengers on the plane? Who and what were they involved with, as well as their families? What were their occupations? What type of influence did they have on upcoming events like elections, law, policy or decision making; money changing hands; financial, political, humanitarian, scientific, or technological deals in progress or under consideration? Who are the people who own or are in charge of the airline and their families? What’s been going on with the Malaysian airline and its competitors lately? What’s been going on in the country politically and economically? There are so many different questions that could be asked, depending on which perspective you look at it from. Maybe this wasn’t an act of terrorism or a suicide mission, maybe this is something else. Maybe I watch too much television.

I don’t know – just something I was thinking about . . .

What Women Look Like Naked. Really


Couldn’t have said it better myself . . . thanks Laura Quick & The Daily Think!
And the imperfections and subtleties we each have are where our beauty lies – this is what makes each of us special and unique.
Just something I was thinking about . . .

The Daily Think

I normally see semi clad women on a fashion shoot, so my perspective has been somewhat distorted. That and all the magazines. Well might I suggest a trip to your local swimming pool. Gentlemen (and I think you already know this) This is what the majority of women look like really. You naughty lying magazines, you.

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN: YOU’VE BEEN TRICKED.

swimming ool changing roomssml

View original post

Writing Skills Not Valued


I was listening to the news today, which is always an adventure for me. There was a report on changes to the high school SAT, which is required by many colleges for admittance. These changes, taking effect in 2016, are to make the test more relevant and to make it easier to pass. Changes included the elimination of the essay portion of the exam, making it optional. Now maybe I am a little biased, as I am a writer, but this says to me that being able to write coherently and mechanically sound is not a needed skill. Then we wonder why we rank so low on the list globally regarding education.

Being a good writer, albeit good communicator, is important. I realize being a good writer does not measure intelligence and that many incredibly brilliant people are not necessarily good writers.  That does not mean we should not strive to master this area in some sort of capacity. I am always amazed at the atrocious writing skills I have seen in those who have master’s degrees and always wonder how they managed to get that degree as poorly as they wrote.

When it comes to jobs – pretty soon, other countries will have the ability to write English better than us – so those jobs will begin to be shipped overseas too. I do some contract copywriting for an internet marketing firm at times. When I was hired, the owner shared with me that the computer programmers and graphic designers he employed were in India. He had found he needed American writers, as it is difficult to find good writers of the English language in other countries. It seems the way we are going, we will outsource ourselves right out of those jobs, too.

I could go on. I have certain reservations about testing protocols, too. But that’s a story for another day. I just know that being able to write well is a valuable commodity, and lowering the standards isn’t going to accomplish what the “powers that be” are trying to accomplish. I don’t believe this is going to make our future leaders as globally competitive as they will need to be – thus, as a nation, we will fall further behind.

Did you know that cursive writing has been removed from the curriculum from many schools? Don’t get me started on that one . . . that’s a subject for another day!

Anyway, just something I was thinking about . . .

harshlypressedbutton